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 Native species

Native species

 Invasive alien species

Invasive alien species

 Species present in Abitibi-Temiscamingue

Species present in Abitibi-Temiscamingue

 Risk of skin reactions when coming into contact with toxic sap

Risk of skin reactions when coming into contact with toxic sap


COMMON REED


Phragmites australis

General characteristics:

  • Wetland plant (marshes, ditches, road rights-of-way).
  • Can grow up to 5-m tall and form dense colonies.
  • Rigid and hollow erect stems, beige or yellowish in color, often hidden by leaf sheath.
  • Alternated, pointed and elongated leaves (20 to 60 cm in length).
  • Purple-colored feathery panicle flowers that become brownish during fructification.
  • Presence of white hairs where the base of the leaf attaches to the stem (ligule).

The common reed has gradually replaced the cattail, which has the ability to filter polluting metals found in drained water more efficiently.

similar species 

 Bluejoint  Calamagrostis canadensis  © Bibiane Racette  

Bluejoint

Calamagrostis canadensis

© Bibiane Racette
 

 reed carnary grass  Phalaris arundinacea  © Bibiane Racette

reed carnary grass

Phalaris arundinacea

© Bibiane Racette

 Smooth brome  Bromus inermis  © Bibiane Racette

Smooth brome

Bromus inermis

© Bibiane Racette


japanese knotweed

Fallopia japonica

General characteristics:

  • Fast growing herbaceous plant, up to 4 m in height.

  • Reddish stem that resembles bamboo.

  • Small clusters of white flowers.
  • Root system releases toxins that are harmful to other species.
  • Resistant to difficult conditions: can grow everywhere, even on asphalt.

When their stems fall to the ground in late winter, they form clumps at the water's edge that prevent native stabilizing plants from settling on the shorelines, which can cause bank erosion.


GIANT HOGWEED

Heracleum mantegazzianum

General characteristics:

  • Giant herbaceous plant that measures 2 to 5 m in height.
  • Present in fields, wastelands and disturbed, wet and riparian environments.
  • Umbels of white flowers, 30 to 60 cm in width, > 50 spokes.
  • The stem is hollow and fluted, with spots varying from raspberry red to purple, with some longue scattered hairs.
  • Leaves divided into one to three leaflets that are heavily lobed and dentate, with a smooth underside or some scattered hairs.
  • Distinguished from the cow parsnip (abundantly hairy) by its height, its generous inflorescence and the presence of scattered hairs on the stem and the underside of the leaves.

Exposure to sap can cause severe skin rashes, blisters or burns that can leave scars. If the sap comes in contact with the eyes, it may cause temporary or permanent blindness.

similar species 

 Cow parsnip  (Heracleum maximum)  © Kriss de Niort  

Cow parsnip

(Heracleum maximum)

© Kriss de Niort
 

 Wild carrot  (Daucus carota)  © miniherbarium  

Wild carrot

(Daucus carota)

© miniherbarium
 

 Wild parsnip  (Pastinaca sativa)  © Ontario’s Invasive Species Awareness Program

Wild parsnip

(Pastinaca sativa)

© Ontario’s Invasive Species Awareness Program


WILD PARSNIP

Pastinaca sativa

general characteristics:

  • Terrestrial herbaceous plant that also tolerates wetlands.
  • Grows on the edge of forests, roads, trails and vacant lots, or on shorelines.
  • Umbels of yellowish flowers 10 to 20 cm in diameter.
  • Is recognizable by its smell, the shape of its leaves and its yellow flowers.
 

Exposure to sap can cause severe skin rashes, blisters or burns that can leave scars. If the sap comes in contact with the eyes, it may cause temporary or permanent blindness.

Similar species 

 Giant hogweed  (Heracleum mantegazzianum)  © Claude Lavoie, ESAD  

Giant hogweed

(Heracleum mantegazzianum)

© Claude Lavoie, ESAD
 

 Cow parsnip   (Heracleum maximum)  © Kriss de Niort  

Cow parsnip

 (Heracleum maximum)

© Kriss de Niort
 

 Wild carrot    (Daucus carota)  © miniherbarium  

Wild carrot  

(Daucus carota)

© miniherbarium
 

If you think you observed an invasive alien specie, please contact us.